Under the Cottonwood Tree

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This past Sunday we held our 3rd Annual Summer Book Club discussion at Buffalo Peaks Ranch. We all gathered by the Main House’s cottonwood tree to discuss Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac, widely considered one of the most influential conservation books of the 20th Century.

Leopold describes the need for a land ethic, seeing the natural world “as a community to which we belong.” This classic book is also a beautifully written story of one man coming to know the land on which he lives. As the Land Library continues to learn more and more about our immediate surroundings (Buffalo Peaks Ranch) it seemed like a perfect book club selection for this summer.

Special thanks goes to Candice Hall for kindly sharing these beautiful images from our 2017 Summer Book Club gathering!

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Under the cottonwood tree, an inviting array of Leopold books, sitting atop one of the Leopold Benches Land Library volunteers built a couple of summers ago.

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After his long career in the National Park Service, and a lifetime of reading and being out on the land, Tom Wylie always adds an interesting perspective….

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along with offering up illuminating passages, copied into one of Tom’s notebooks.

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True to Aldo Leopold’s amazingly observant writing, Candice Hall spent time roaming across the ranch on Sunday. Taking photos out by the Lambing Barn….

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amidst the high sage by the Bunkhouse, and looking up valley too:

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What a perfect setting to experience the always evolving thoughts of Aldo Leopold, and to contemplate the need for a land ethic for our own time.

“All ethics so far evolved rest upon a single premise: that the individual is a member of a community of interdependent parts. The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, water, plants and animals, or collectively the land.”  Aldo Leopold, from A Sand County Almanac

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